July 21st, 2005
skirt


Today I put on my favorite jean skirt that used to be my mother’s. It is a wide a-line shape from the 1970′s, and has large deep pockets on the front, perfect for holding your money, pieces of paper, or some candy. When I wear it I feel close to her because she wore the skirt a lot and I know she must have enjoyed walking along with her hands deep in the pockets, or collecting small stones as she strolled barefoot along the beach (which was quite a bit). You would only know this after wearing the skirt and walking around in it for a while.
I think it must be the most durable skirt that has ever been made because it shows no signs of wear, and I feel kind of invincible in it. Maybe it has protective qualities. Mom strength that she left for me as a gift. I haven’t been able to wear it until recently.
I rode my bike along the main street to do some errands, (this is the kind of skirt you can ride a bike in). When I passed my neighbor’s studio door I heard the distinct sound of a violin being played (he is a violin maker). I put my bike down quickly and tip-toed up to the door to listen. And I sat there listening and smiling for quite some time. This is one of the great gifts of knowing a violin maker, you get to hear beautiful music from time to time, drifting out onto the street. It stops me every time. When he finished playing I poked my head in the door to thank him.
Tonight I danced around my room in the skirt listening to Sarah Harmer.
My mom did a LOT of dancing around rooms in her lifetime.

Jul 22 2005
2:23 pm
keri Smith writes:

“Passionate Nomad’ is a book that I started reading this week. I posted it on the sidebar.
I am drawn to Freya Stark for her sense of adventure and her courageous spirit, she was one of the first women to venture into remote parts of the world alone. There has been no mention or reference to anti-Semetism in the biography at all. In fact this is the first I have heard of it.
Candace, I am curious as to what your source is. Is it found in her writings? Or is it just a known fact about her as a historical figure?

Jul 22 2005
2:23 pm
keri Smith writes:

“Passionate Nomad’ is a book that I started reading this week. I posted it on the sidebar.
I am drawn to Freya Stark for her sense of adventure and her courageous spirit, she was one of the first women to venture into remote parts of the world alone. There has been no mention or reference to anti-Semetism in the biography at all. In fact this is the first I have heard of it.
Candace, I am curious as to what your source is. Is it found in her writings? Or is it just a known fact about her as a historical figure?

Jul 22 2005
2:51 pm
keri Smith writes:

update:
I did a google search and found several articles talking about Freya’s anti-Zionist stance and propaganda.
It seems sad to me that a woman who traveled the world, spoke 7 languages, made a living out of learning about and understanding different cultures would be so exclusionary in her political beliefs (or should I say religious beliefs?).
So I put this out there…
as a reader of biographies (and as humans), do we discredit someone who has lived an interesting and powerful life and contributed much to our own learning and growth when we discover a hurtful and disturbing dark side, one that we were unaware of?
Do we all not have our own darkside?
Or do we look closer at it and try to understand it’s reasons for existing? Thereby making peace with the thing that is hurtful?

Jul 22 2005
2:51 pm
keri Smith writes:

update:
I did a google search and found several articles talking about Freya’s anti-Zionist stance and propaganda.
It seems sad to me that a woman who traveled the world, spoke 7 languages, made a living out of learning about and understanding different cultures would be so exclusionary in her political beliefs (or should I say religious beliefs?).
So I put this out there…
as a reader of biographies (and as humans), do we discredit someone who has lived an interesting and powerful life and contributed much to our own learning and growth when we discover a hurtful and disturbing dark side, one that we were unaware of?
Do we all not have our own darkside?
Or do we look closer at it and try to understand it’s reasons for existing? Thereby making peace with the thing that is hurtful?

Jul 23 2005
10:51 am
keri Smith writes:

thank you Candace, et al.
I am sad to learn about Freya, it has tainted my impression of her (which sucks because I was really enjoying the book, I haven’t yet decided if I will finish it). It’s hard to really throw myself into her life when at my core I have a problem with someone whose message has the root of hate in it. I think you bring up another good point, at some level we need people who have displayed hurtful behavior to acknowledge their own darkness. We need to see some remorse or it makes forgiveness difficult (or impossible). Especially true in the case of war criminals.
This issue has happened many times in my reading travels, more recently with the author Osho, who wrote some beautiful enlightened words but in real life was a cult leader who had regular sex with his followers, in an obvious case of misuse of power. Yikes.
k.

Jul 23 2005
10:51 am
keri Smith writes:

thank you Candace, et al.
I am sad to learn about Freya, it has tainted my impression of her (which sucks because I was really enjoying the book, I haven’t yet decided if I will finish it). It’s hard to really throw myself into her life when at my core I have a problem with someone whose message has the root of hate in it. I think you bring up another good point, at some level we need people who have displayed hurtful behavior to acknowledge their own darkness. We need to see some remorse or it makes forgiveness difficult (or impossible). Especially true in the case of war criminals.
This issue has happened many times in my reading travels, more recently with the author Osho, who wrote some beautiful enlightened words but in real life was a cult leader who had regular sex with his followers, in an obvious case of misuse of power. Yikes.
k.


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